Network Closet Vulnerabilities – Cybersecurity

Greetings and welcome back!  In today’s blog we will look at the problem of cybersecurity in network closets and small server rooms.  This is of particular importance to those who fall under the requirements of HIPAA, PCI-DSS or Gramm Leach Bliley as they make no distinction in where the data is located or the size of the data room.  In fact, while larger data centers often have layers of physical and cybersecurity, smaller network closets and server rooms have little, and in some cases no meaningful physical or cybersecurity.

There are a large group of smaller network rooms whose only cybersecurity is an inexpensive firewall box, which is easily evaded by a hacker.  Hackers or professional cyber criminals do not like to leave a trail to follow so, once they enter a network they often look for a device in which to hide-out while they explore the network and look for targets from which to steal data.  We have found that a favorite place to hide for these criminals in inside the network card of a Rack UPS or Power Distribution Unit (PDU).  In fact, one of the most spectacular data thefts in the past couple of years was executed through the Rack PDU of a cloud service provider.  This excellent article shows how the Rack PDU’s were used as a jumping-off-point into the servers in order to steal data.

In addition to using a Rack UPS or PDU as a hiding place from which to launch an attack on the servers within that rack, these networked power units can also be used to shut down servers and even to destroy the data in the servers.  The widely-publicized Ukrainian Power Plant hack was an excellent example of how a UPS system can be used to shut down and then wreak havoc on servers.  In this case, Malware was used to program two UPS units to shut down at exactly the same time, cutting power to all critical servers and desk tops in the power plant.

If your systems are covered under security regulations, they must have backup power systems and, if they have backup power systems, they also must be protected from hackers.  It is wishful thinking to assume all cyberattacks on a server will be from the front-door.  In today’s world of increasingly sophisticated bad guys, back doors to servers – such as those offered by UPS and PDU systems – make perfect cover for a data thief.

Fortunately, RackGuardian was designed from the ground-up to both monitor your network/server room power and environment and to provide full firewall protection at the same time.  That’s because RackGuardian includes a private network port on which to query any SNMP or Modbus system securely in its own cyber-safe envelope.  The RackGuardian seals-off all units that it monitors because its second network port pushes data to the cloud but it will not accept ANY attempts to connect with it.  All of your SNMP and Modbus systems that are being monitored by RackGuardian are invisible to the outside world because there is no way to get through the RackGuardian to see them.

If you have network closets and server rooms that need to be protected, please don’t just protect the front-door of your servers, protect the back door of your UPS and PDU units and keep the bad-guys at bay!

Until Next Time,

Be Well!