Secure, Unified Monitoring for All Your Network Closets

Many organizations have dozens, even hundreds of network closets, server labs and other small IT and Telecom rooms in their facility or campus.  All-too-often, these rooms have been monitored by multiple applications with a Network Management System (NMS) monitoring the SNMP devices, a Building Management System (BMS) monitoring the environmental and power conditions and a Security Management System (SMS) monitoring the entrance to these rooms.  RackGuardian is the first product built to provide Secure, Unified Monitoring for All Your Network Closets.  For the first time, you can monitor all your SNMP, Environmental, Power and Security Systems on a single, secure, cloud-based platform.

RackGuardian is a secure, cloud-based management appliance which you place in each of your network rooms.  It has a secure port from which to gather information from any SNMP, Modbus or other network device.  It also contains 4 environmental monitoring ports which can connect to temperature, humidity, water leak detection, fire alarm or other sensors. In addition, it also includes two Wiegand access control ports which can interface with most any card-access or biometric access system.  This gives you total scope monitoring capabilities for each room in which you place a RackGuardian.

As RackGuardian gathers data, it continuously monitors this data with self-learning analytics.  This allows the system to eliminate nuisance alarms from traditional high-low alarm set points by using its patent-pending alarm analytics.  The self-learning analytics literally learn the normal operating parameters of each device and each data-point within each device.  By doing this, you know that,  when the RackGuardian system does send you an alarm, a statistically significant event is near.

RackGuardian pushes all its statistical data to the AlphaGuardian secure cloud server once per minute – unless an alarm is spotted, in which case it pushes this data immediately to the cloud for alarm notification.  All data pushed to the cloud is done by secure 2048 bit encryption – Military grade protection.  In addition, the data is pushed because the RackGuardian acts as a data diode, one-way communication device.  It pushes data to the cloud securely but it will NOT allow any device to connect to itself or to any of the devices that it is protecting.  In fact, once a device is connected to the RackGuardian, it becomes stealth to your network.  No one can see the device or even knows that it exists.

Having a secure, cloud system that unifies all of your devices is a strategic advantage.  When you use different systems to monitor the same rooms, you have a potential for confusion and even disaster.  RackGuardian has a heirarchical, stratified access system that allows multiple departments and multiple levels within those departments to see only the items under their control.  In this way, the facilities department can securely see the environmental and power conditions, the network manager can see their servers, switches and other SNMP devices and the security officer can see when and by whom each room is accessed.

By eliminating multiple systems with a single, unified system, RackGuardian saves money both in the short and long term.  By offering all data in a secure, cloud-based platform, you have the ability to scale from a small number of rooms in one site to thousands of sites on a national or even global scale.  RackGuardian’s power can be seen in the diagram below which slows its security, simplicity and power.

a Secured, Unified Platform for Monitoring Your Network Closets

 

Until Next Time,

 

Be Well!

 

Securing Network Closets in Healthcare Facilities

Greetings and welcome back.  In today’s blog we look at a subject that is all-too-often overlooked in hospitals, doctors offices, and other medical facilities: Securing Network Closets in Healthcare Facilities.  The fact is, healthcare records have the largest value of any type of record in the black market for Personally Identifiable Information (PII).  Because of this, healthcare facilities will always be prime targets for data thieves and network closets are one of the most poorly secured part of most healthcare facilities.

In a study of all network closets in a large university, this excellent paper published by East Tennessee State University by Nathan Timbs shows that there were, on average, more than 1 threat, hazard or vulnerability for each of the 82 network closets surveyed.  Not surprisingly, data thieves have become very accomplished at using vulnerabilities in the cyber/physical security of wiring closets to steal large quantities of valuable data.  Another excellent paper published online by Towson State University shows how easily a person can gain physical access to a network closet to place an eavesdropping device into most any network.  This device – which can be a simple switch that is converted to their own nefarious purposes – then sends data offsite to their data capture system, completing the theft process.

This process, known as a man-in-the-middle attack system, is surprisingly fast and easy to add to any network closet.  In fact, some of the largest data thefts recorded have been accomplished by cyber/physical man-in-the-middle attacks such as those discussed by these two excellent papers.   This creates a significant challenge to healthcare facilities because HIPAA requires security of all your Physical, Cyber and Operational assets as is shown in the following graphic and, network closets are definitely a key to being secure and HIPAA Compliant.

Securing Network Closets in Healthcare Facilities

 

Because of these issues, it is vital that Physical, Cyber and Operational security need to be addressed in the network closet, preferably with a single unified solution.  RackGuardian was build from the ground-up to be a system that provides full physical and cybersecurity to your network closets and all of the equipment within them.

RackGuardian does all the following:

  • Interfaces and securely manages any Wiegand-Based Access Card System
  • Interfaces and protects any SNMP-based computer, network or power system
  • Provides full physical and operational monitoring of the network closet

Please think about this and take a look at RackGuardian.  We would be happy to confidentially discuss the security of your network closets for your facility.

Until Next Time,

Be Well!

Network Closet Vulnerabilities – Cybersecurity

Greetings and welcome back!  In today’s blog we will look at the problem of cybersecurity in network closets and small server rooms.  This is of particular importance to those who fall under the requirements of HIPAA, PCI-DSS or Gramm Leach Bliley as they make no distinction in where the data is located or the size of the data room.  In fact, while larger data centers often have layers of physical and cybersecurity, smaller network closets and server rooms have little, and in some cases no meaningful physical or cybersecurity.

There are a large group of smaller network rooms whose only cybersecurity is an inexpensive firewall box, which is easily evaded by a hacker.  Hackers or professional cyber criminals do not like to leave a trail to follow so, once they enter a network they often look for a device in which to hide-out while they explore the network and look for targets from which to steal data.  We have found that a favorite place to hide for these criminals in inside the network card of a Rack UPS or Power Distribution Unit (PDU).  In fact, one of the most spectacular data thefts in the past couple of years was executed through the Rack PDU of a cloud service provider.  This excellent article shows how the Rack PDU’s were used as a jumping-off-point into the servers in order to steal data.

In addition to using a Rack UPS or PDU as a hiding place from which to launch an attack on the servers within that rack, these networked power units can also be used to shut down servers and even to destroy the data in the servers.  The widely-publicized Ukrainian Power Plant hack was an excellent example of how a UPS system can be used to shut down and then wreak havoc on servers.  In this case, Malware was used to program two UPS units to shut down at exactly the same time, cutting power to all critical servers and desk tops in the power plant.

If your systems are covered under security regulations, they must have backup power systems and, if they have backup power systems, they also must be protected from hackers.  It is wishful thinking to assume all cyberattacks on a server will be from the front-door.  In today’s world of increasingly sophisticated bad guys, back doors to servers – such as those offered by UPS and PDU systems – make perfect cover for a data thief.

Fortunately, RackGuardian was designed from the ground-up to both monitor your network/server room power and environment and to provide full firewall protection at the same time.  That’s because RackGuardian includes a private network port on which to query any SNMP or Modbus system securely in its own cyber-safe envelope.  The RackGuardian seals-off all units that it monitors because its second network port pushes data to the cloud but it will not accept ANY attempts to connect with it.  All of your SNMP and Modbus systems that are being monitored by RackGuardian are invisible to the outside world because there is no way to get through the RackGuardian to see them.

If you have network closets and server rooms that need to be protected, please don’t just protect the front-door of your servers, protect the back door of your UPS and PDU units and keep the bad-guys at bay!

Until Next Time,

Be Well!

 

Network Closet Security Vulnerabilities – Physical Security

Greetings and welcome back.  In this blog, we take a close look at Network Closet Security Vulnerabilities – Physical Security.  This is the first in a new series on the key types of network closet security flaws.  This is a key topic, especially for all those of you who are covered under HIPAA, PCI-DSS, FERPA, Gramm Leach Bliley and other data security regulations.  The fact is, as more data shifts to the cloud, that means that more data is transported through your network closets to the various cloud providers that you employ.  Because cloud services tend to be well-fortressed, cyber criminals are turning to the easiest way to get to that data – your network closets.

To begin with, all of the key data security regulations require you to physically secure your data.  Here are some key provisions with which we should all take time to familiarize ourselves:

HIPAA Section 164.310: “Facility Access Controls. Implement policies and procedures to limit physical access to its electronic information systems and the facility or facilities in which they are housed, while ensuring that properly authorized access is allowed.”

PCI-DSS Requirement 9.1: Verify the existence of physical security controls for each computer room, data center, and other physical areas with systems in the cardholder data environment. Without physical access controls, such as badge systems and door controls, unauthorized persons could potentially gain access to the facility to steal, disable, disrupt, or destroy critical systems and cardholder data. 

GRAMM LEACH BLILEY: “Management should deploy adequate physical security in a layered or zoned approach at every IT operations center commensurate with the value, confidentiality, and criticality of the data stored or accessible and the identified risks.”

Its clear from these sections of security codes that you need to provide a secure card-based access system in order to be compliant with major data security regulations.  What isn’t clear is which physical security system is the best for your application.  Fortunately, our RackGuardian system is one of the only systems that supports virtually any access card on the market.  That means that, if you are already using a card access system for your main door at your facility, chances are very good that RackGuardian can support that card on a plug-and-play basis.  If, on the other hand, you need a new access card system, then we also have you covered.

In the next 2 blogs, we plan to look at cybersecurity and also backup power and environmental security for your data.  Please take a good look at RackGuardian and we believe that you will find that its the most powerful security product for data security on the market.  We welcome you to contact us with any questions about your individual security needs.

Until next time,

Be Well!

Network Closet Security – Physical Security

Greetings and welcome back.  In this blog, we take a close look at Network Closet Security Vulnerabilities – Physical Security.  This is the first in a new series on the key types of network closet security flaws.  This is a key topic, especially for all those of you who are covered under HIPAA, PCI-DSS, FERPA, Gramm Leach Bliley and other data security regulations.  The fact is, as more data shifts to the cloud, that means that more data is transported through your network closets to the various cloud providers that you employ.  Because cloud services tend to be well-fortressed, cyber criminals are turning to the easiest way to get to that data – your network closets.

To begin with, all of the key data security regulations require you to physically secure your data.  Here are some key provisions with which we should all take time to familiarize ourselves:

HIPAA Section 164.310: “Facility Access Controls. Implement policies and procedures to limit physical access to its electronic information systems and the facility or facilities in which they are housed, while ensuring that properly authorized access is allowed.”

PCI-DSS Requirement 9.1: Verify the existence of physical security controls for each computer room, data center, and other physical areas with systems in the cardholder data environment. Without physical access controls, such as badge systems and door controls, unauthorized persons could potentially gain access to the facility to steal, disable, disrupt, or destroy critical systems and cardholder data. 

GRAMM LEACH BLILEY: “Management should deploy adequate physical security in a layered or zoned approach at every IT operations center commensurate with the value, confidentiality, and criticality of the data stored or accessible and the identified risks.”

Its clear from these sections of security codes that you need to provide a secure card-based access system in order to be compliant with major data security regulations.  What isn’t clear is which physical security system is the best for your application.  Fortunately, our RackGuardian system is one of the only systems that supports virtually any access card on the market.  That means that, if you are already using a card access system for your main door at your facility, chances are very good that RackGuardian can support that card on a plug-and-play basis.  If, on the other hand, you need a new access card system, then we also have you covered.

In the next 2 blogs, we plan to look at cybersecurity and also backup power and environmental security for your data.  Please take a good look at RackGuardian and we believe that you will find that its the most powerful security product for data security on the market.  We welcome you to contact us with any questions about your individual security needs.

Until next time,

Be Well!

 

Server & Telecom Racks and New York Cybersecurity Law

Greetings and welcome back!  Beginning this week, we are going to dovetail our discussions of the Federal Gramm Leach Bliley Act (GLBA) for financial services companies together with the New York Cybersecurity Regulations for Financial Services Companies.  Because New York is the home to many of the country’s financial services companies, it seems natural to address both the Federal Standards of GLBA with the State Standards for financial companies in one logical set of blogs.  So today, we begin this series by looking at Server & Telecom Racks and New York Cybersecurity Law.

The timing of beginning our discussion is centered around the enforcement of the New York Regulations, which began last week on August 27th.  The NY Cybersecurity regs are an extremely comprehensive set of requirements that cover all in-state and international operations for a financial entity of over $5 million in revenue.  While not having the power to regulate operations in other states, the Department of Financial Services (DFS) in New York makes it clear that any branch office in another state that impacts the operations of a New York office will be dealt with accordingly.  This is a polite way of saying that if security is truly needed in New York then it only makes sense to follow the same procedures for all locations, regardless of location.

To begin with, let’s talk about what the NY Regulations cover.  Specifically, the regulations require securing 6 different types of systems from affecting information stored by a covered entity in 3 different ways.  The 6 types of systems that must be protected are as follows:

500.01 (e) Information System means a discrete set of electronic information resources organized for the collection, processing, maintenance, use, sharing, dissemination or disposition of electronic information, as well as any specialized system such as industrial/process controls systems, telephone switching and private branch exchange systems, and environmental control systems.

The 3 types of coverage for the information that these systems support are as follows:

500.02 (a) Cybersecurity Program. Each Covered Entity shall maintain a cybersecurity program designed to protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability of the Covered Entity’s Information Systems.

When we combine these regulations, we see that  the integrity and availability of IT and Telecom systems must be protected by actively securing and monitoring backup power, cooling and physical security systems.  Any interruption in power or cooling to an IT or Telecom system can corrupt or destroy the data that is to be protected.  This means that the following systems must be protected in order to be in compliance with the law:

  • Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) and Power Distribution Units (PDU)
  • Cooling Systems for the Data, Network or Telecom Racks
  • Physical Access Systems

These regulations make it clear that your racks of servers and telecom systems together with their UPS, PDU, Cooling and Physical Access systems must be secured and monitored.  While protecting these types of systems in a large data center can be done in a more centralized fashion, the ability to protect distributed racks and support systems is a much more difficult task. These racks are found in places like:

  • Network Rooms and Closets including all IDF and MDF Rooms
  • Telecom Rooms and Closets including PBX and Telecom Switch Rooms
  • Small Server Rooms

Virtually all the systems in these server, network, telecom, power and cooling systems found in these rooms are rack-mounted systems.   Because of this, the security regulations require a rack-based system that is able to both secure and monitor all of these systems.  We designed RackGuardian do be a fully-enabled Smart Firewall unit that both provides integrated firewall security and analytic monitoring for any server, telecom system, UPS, PDU and cooling unit.

In coming blogs, we will discuss the specific ways in which UPS and PDU units have already been used to attack information systems.  We will also address attacks on telephone switching and PBX systems and how they have had disastrous effects on their owners.  In addition, we will take a look at how the GLBA regulations integrate with the New York State regulations and how complementary they are to one another.

If you would like to have a confidential discussion on protecting your server and telecom racks from cyber, physical and operational attacks, we would be happy to work with you to provide the protection and compliance you need for your company.

Until Next Time,

Be Well!

 

PCI-DSS Requirements for Backup Power Security

Greetings and welcome back!  In today’s blog we are going to look at a critical segment of PCI-DSS security that is often overlooked: PCI-DSS Requirements for Backup Power Security.  To begin with, PCI PIN Security Requirements and Testing Procedures require the use of an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) as given in the following section:

32-5 All access-control and monitoring systems (including intrusion-detection systems) are powered through an uninterruptible power source (UPS).

This makes good sense because, in the event of a power failure, if security access control and monitoring systems are offline, someone could easily force their way into a network closet and your data rack and simply pick up the server and walk out with it.  Needless to say, you must have enough power to ride-through a significant power outage but, how much backup power is enough?  PCI-DSS standards do not say but, it is interesting to note that the FCC now requires telecom providers to supply 8 hours of backup power to any IP-based telephone system or line.  While that may seem like a long time, consider this: the loss of power for a utility customer in the US can average nearly 5 hours in length as this annual report from the US Energy Information Agency shows.

PCI-DSS Requirements for Backup Power Security

Let’s take a look at the detail of this chart.  The total time of an outage is broken down into “non major events” and “major events”.  Non major events tend to be local outages caused by such things as a blown transformer within a utility system.  Major events are normally related to weather such as significant thunderstorms.  As the graph shows, major events are always longer, on average, than are non-major events within a utility’s own system.  But, even the best performance for outages – from municipally owned utilities – shows a nearly one hour power outage for a system-caused problem and the municipal utility average for a major event was 2 hours.

The long and short of this is that, if you fall under PCI-DSS, you need to backup the security systems protecting your server’s data for a minimum of 2 hours.  If you are within an investor-owned utility’s service area, the average outage with a major event is 3.5 hours and with a co-op, its nearly 5 hours.  So, if you fail to provide the proper backup and someone simply walks in and steals your server, you would be liable under the “reasonable man” concept of law from any credit card lawsuits that result from this type of data loss.

In addition to purchasing a UPS with sufficient battery backup time, you also need to monitor that UPS and its battery time.  Why do you need to do this?  The answer is that batteries, whether in your car or in a UPS, degrade over time.  With each passing year they provide less and less ability to generate the power that you need.  In addition, batteries degrade with each cycle in which they are used.  So, if your site is located in an area where there are lots of power flickers, those sub-second flickers actually cause the UPS to go onto battery and will also affect the backup battery life.

Fortunately, most UPS system provide a serial or network port that allows you to monitor the battery conditions and ensure that you will have the necessary battery backup time if it is needed.  Our RackGuardian product was designed with securing a rack and protecting its power systems from physical, operational or cyber problems.  RackGuardian integrates with any type of card-key or biometric door locking system, allowing you to be fully compliant with PCI-DSS physical security requirements.  In addition, RackGuardian plugs into the network or serial port of your UPS as well as your Rack Power Distribution Unit (PDU) to secure these systems from a cyber or physical attack and to monitor their system integrity.  RackGuardian’s exclusive and patented power analytics will provide you with an early warning to any problem with your battery system, ensuring that you have the battery backup time available when you need it.

Think about these things a bit and, we would be more than happy to have a confidential discussion about protecting your data and your backup power systems.  In fact, our experts can actually help you choose the best power system for you from the numerous sources available to us.  So, until next time,

 

Be Well!

HIPAA Environmental Monitoring Standards

Greetings and welcome back!  This week we continue our series on the cyber, physical and operational security standards for HIPAA compliance.  Specifically, we take a look at HIPAA Environmental Monitoring Standards for the cooling and protection of the servers where your ePHI is stored.

SECURING ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND CONTROL SYSTEMS

Medical records must be protected from more than just cyber or physical threats. HIPAA Security standards require that they must also be protected from destruction in the event of a natural or environmental event. This is specifically provided for in

HIPAA Section 164.304“Physical safeguards are physical measures, policies, and procedures to protect a covered entity’s electronic information systems and related buildings and equipment, from natural and environmental hazards…

What are some of the environmental hazards that can cause the downtime, damage or data loss in the electronic information systems?  Here are a few that have been singled out in data environments:

  1. HVAC Cooling failure in server room or network closet resulting in overheated servers and downed ePHI systems
  2. Server cooling fan failure resulting in shutdown of ePHI server
  3. Water leak over servers or network equipment resulting in destruction of ePHI servers and data

All of these environmental problems are real problems that are often cited for failure of Information Systems equipment. As shown in this recent study of IT Systems Failure by the Uptime Institute, environmental-related failure is the 3rd largest cause of system downtime.  If you add “Weather Related” including water from heavy rains, etc, you get over one quarter of all IT system failure is due to environmental causes.

HIPAA Environmental Monitoring Standards

HIPAA requires all covered entities and business partners to have environmental monitoring for the rooms that contain their ePHI but, very few have taken this requirement seriously.  Because over a quarter of all ePHI system failure and data loss is related to environmental causes (and data loss is a HIPAA violation), it is penny-wise and dollar-foolish to fail to provide proper environmental monitoring for your server rooms.

Our RackGuardian system is purpose-built to provide cyber, physical and operational protection for all of your environmental control systems.  Please think about this and feel free to give us a call to confidentially discuss the protection of your critical server and network rooms.

Until Next Time,

Be Well!

 

Server and Telecom Rack Physical Security Compliance

This week, we continue our series on: The 3 Functions of Rack Security Compliance. As a quick reminder, these 3 functions are the following:

  1. Cybersecurity
  2. Physical Network Security
  3. Operational Security

This week, we focus on the second function of data center security compliance, namely: Physical Network Security. Physical Network Security systems in most data centers are comprised of 3 layers:

  1. Perimeter access security
  2. Rack physical access security

Its important to understand that most physical access security systems use standard protocols to make communication easy. Just like SNMP is the most common protocol used for network management communications, the Wiegand protocol is the most common protocol used for security management communications. Since few have heard of Wiegand, the first question is: what is the Wiegand protocol? The answer is that it is actually a group of standards all under one collective heading. It includes a method of communication between the card or fob reader and the controller unit as well as methods for storing data on both the card or fob and the controller. We are focusing on the communication aspect of the system as that is where much of the vulnerability lies.

Much of what I am sharing today comes from several well documented research projects that target Wiegand-based access systems. Brad Antoneiwicz from the Open Security Research group at Foundstone Security, a part of Intel Security has done excellent research in this area. You may want to link to his blog post about Wiegand vulnerabilities here and you may see an excellent presentation that he did gave that is posted online here. Brad shows in his blog and his presentation that it is easy to establish a man-in-the-middle attack on an card access system. That’s because the process is very easy execute in a small time frame and with limited tools and resources. Just as SNMP is vulnerable to virtual man-in-the-middle (MitM) attacks on network systems, so too card access systems can be attacked by a physical MitM gain entry to data centers and data racks.

With a simple Arduino board and some good logic, Antoneisicz shows us that you can easily gain access to any Wiegand-based card access system. The protocol is trivial to duplicate and you can use something as simple as a battery-powered Arduino to hijack a card access system and gain entrance into a data rack and its valuable data. It turns out that, while some parts of card access systems do offer some level of encryption (for example, the server usually offers https for remote management security) the serial communications from the card reader to the card controller is almost always open to intercept. This allows you to read, communicate and ultimately, hijack the card reader to gain full access to that facility or rack.

For those of you who really want to take a deep dive on the subject of access card reader hacking – including hacking the actual RFID signal from the access card – here is a truly detailed report from Bishop Fox Security.  This presentation was very well received at the DefCon hackers convention in the summer of 2015 and it considered the definitive published work of all the easiest means to hack access security cards.  Everyone who uses a security access card system should familiarize themselves with this report.

So what is the bottom line here? It is that access cards are easily hacked.  The serial communications on a card access system are NOT supervised or encrypted but, are allowed to pass freely in open protocol format from point to point.  Similarly, the RFID signal on an access card floats freely and anyone can grab that signal and use it to create a duplicate card or otherwise hack an access system.   Anyone who can gain access to the wire or wireless data from a card can gain access to whatever that card system is supposed to be protecting.

Fortunately, there is an answer to this huge security hole. Our RackGuardian has an plug-in product known at the EnviroScout which can inspect and supervise ALL communications from the Wiegand-based reader to the controller. If this device sees any signs of tampering, the RackGuardian will immediately send a message to our server and then to our IOS device within 2 seconds of detection.  The combination of instant notification to your mobile device coupled with our on-board analytics to catch any signs of tampering gives you the security that you need in your data center.

As a reader of this blog, you know that security compliance is serious business and its getting more pervasive all the time. We have shown through peer-reviewed research that existing card access systems fail to pass a simple third-party security test. Please consider discussing your physical security needs with one of our experts and lock-down your data center and data racks today.

Until next time,

Be Well!

Cyber Attack Using Rack PDUs as a Backdoor to Server Data

Greetings and welcome back!  This month we look at something that we have been predicting for some time, a Cyber Attack Using Rack PDU’s as a Backdoor to Server Data.  There was an excellent article on this in Identity Week last month.  In this article, it discusses an attack on DDoS protection firm Staminus.  In this attack, the intruders managed to do all of the following:

  • Bring down Staminus’ entire network
  • Reset routers to factory settings
  • Stole Staminus’ databases and dumped the contents online

The attackers were brazen to say the least as they actually posted how they hacked Staminus with an online post.  The two key factors they mentioned in their attack were:

  • Use one root password for all the boxes
  • Expose PDUs to WAN with telnet authority

The first mistake is all-too-common for any type of equipment.  If you use the same password for everything, a hacker only needs to break it once and they are in.  The second problem is the specific reason that we built RackGuardian.  Here, they used an open Telnet port on rack PDU’s to gain backdoor access into the servers in the rack.  I will add that, whether a hacker uses Telnet, FTP or SNMP, each of these ports is normally open on a rack PDU and each has minimal security.

So what can you do once you gain access into a rack PDU?  Plenty!  You can immediately traverse to the servers in the rack if they are on the same sub net.  If they are on a different subnet, you will first need to go to the switch and then back again.  In this case, its not clear which they did as they also had the open passwords on the switches and routers.

The long and short is that a rack PDU makes a perfect camoflauge as a sniper nest to extract data from a server without easily being observed.  After all, who expects data to be coming from a rack PDU?

The moral of the story is clear: You MUST secure your rack PDU’s and RackGuardian is the only product that is specifically built with this purpose in mind.  Cyber Attack Using Rack PDUs is a real threat to every organization.  RackGuardian does all the things that you need to protect your rack systems from harm.  It plugs into the Ethernet ports of your Rack PDU, UPS and other systems and it provides full monitoring of the power and environment in your rack – while it secures all of your rack power and environmental systems from being used as hacker targets.

Think about this and, we would be more than happy to have a confidential conversation about how to protect your rack systems.

Until next time,

Be Well!